Mendoza School of Business

Management Undergraduate Courses

Undergraduate Management & Organizational Courses

A study of the management process including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Emphasis is placed on executive leadership, organizational behavior, and management theory.

This course is designed to give the student an introduction to the central questions and fundamental character of ethics and morality. The course is focused on a discussion of ethical theories that can help to guide students’ problem solving in ethical situations they will encounter in business. Ethical dilemmas faced by business people will be integrated into the class for purposes of discussion and analysis.

The Foresight course challenges students to engage in the process of identifying and evaluating major issues and trends impacting society in the future and exploring potential business implications that can drive sustainable innovation. The course is designed to facilitate three core thinking skills (critical, systems and creative) within a framework of foresight tools and methods for assessing change, forecasting future scenarios and analyzing implications of future change. Students apply these thinking skills and the foresight framework in a semester-long team project on a topic of their choice to develop insights on emerging opportunities and provide recommendations on how business can positively influence future change and create resilient strategies to enable success in an uncertain future.

Strategic management deals with the organization, management, and strategic positioning of the firm so as to gain long-term competitive advantage. Up until this time, most of your business education has emphasized a specialized, functional perspective of business situations (e.g., marketing, human resources, accounting, finance, operations management). In this course, we integrate these acquired skills by taking the perspective of a general manager (or, equivalently, a management consultant). General managers are responsible for setting the goals, objectives, and strategies of the organizations they lead as well as the implementation and execution of such plans. To do this, managers must be capable of understanding and utilizing the knowledge from each of the organization’s functional areas to develop a cohesive and effective competitive strategy. In addition, they must be able to analyze competitive situations within industries in order to understand the sources of the firm’s competitive advantage. In today’s business environment, whether you are a new hire, consultant, or the CEO, you must be capable of thinking strategically.

Management Consulting Major Core Courses (required)

A principal challenge for every manager is to determine what sorts of arguments others will find persuasive. Communication is at the heart of what business is about: writing, speaking, and listening are skills that will permit you to succeed. We’ll use case studies to examine authentic business problems and we’ll offer coaching, feedback, and peer review to develop the skills that executives, customers, employees, shareholders, the press, and the public find so valuable in a professional manager.

Businesses constantly face problems – how to increase revenues, decrease costs, if and where to expand, finding the right product portfolio balance, identifying the optimal markets, etc.  Oftentimes these decisions are required to be made quickly, complicated by a fast changing environment and dispersed teams.  As stated by Bartkus and Conlon in the course text Getting It Right, “In times of great uncertainty, ever more rigorous habits of mind are required to solve problems.”  Using hands-on techniques and tools practiced by leading consulting firms you will increase proficiency in how to identify problems, generate ideas, gather data, identify creative solutions, and then communicate these recommendations effectively.  This course will be hands on, with live cases provided directly from consulting firms and presented directly to their team of consultants.   This class will help you determine the right approach to understanding business problems by teaching you to ask the right questions, improving your judgment, and optimizing your decision making.

Information Technology Consulting Electives (choose 3 of the 5)

While Amazon and Dell used the internet to create new retailing business models, that same technology was instrumental in destroying the business models of the telephone and music industries. What caused the difference? We’ll examine how to use IT for competitive advantage in a digital economy. We’ll explore how IT improves problem solving, productivity, quality, customer service, and process reengineering. We’ll also examine how to apply current technologies in innovative ways to impact an organization’s bottom line.

Whether you become a high-profile real estate developer, an investment banker, or an entrepreneur, in any career you’ll need some project management skills to get your job done. Everyone tries to get projects finished on time and under budget, but many critical business projects fail anyway. We’ll learn the steps associated with successful project management, examine some optimization techniques, learn how to use the software tools that enhance productivity, and discuss how to avoid the implementation pitfalls that cause good people doing good projects to fail.

A principal challenge for anyone working with ubiquitous data is communicating results of an analysis to stakeholders. This course teaches students the art of clear, effective, and engaging data presentation with attention to the business necessity of translating complex technical subjects into actionable insights for a lay audience. Students will harness the power of storytelling for the strategic benefit of an organization by turning a raw set of data into a compelling message that resonates with an intended audience.

Visualization techniques are increasingly important for understanding what can be learned from unstructured data sets, and demand is strong for analytical skills in this area. A typical example might involve analyzing all tweets for a particular topic to better understand consumer sentiment, where traditional analytical approaches face challenges not only due to the massive scale of the data, but also because it is unstructured. Even semi-structured data, which may be described by tags or in other ways, do not conform to the standard table structures. Students in this class will gain experience capturing, storing, and visualizing large sets of unstructured and semi-structured data using a variety of contemporary technologies such as Hadoop, PowerPivot and Tableau.

Relational databases store the majority of the information used in business analytics efforts and data analysts work with these crucial infrastructure platforms on a daily basis. In this course, you will gain an understanding of the key concepts surrounding the storage and security of structured data in relational databases. You will learn how to create, modify and query databases using the Structured Query Language (SQL). You will also discover how data analysts clean and transform this data into forms suitable for analysis using the R programming language. Finally, you will gain an understanding of the issues surrounding Big Data applications and the use of unstructured data in business analytics efforts.

 

Management Consulting Major Additional Courses (choose 5 of the 6)

Some people find joy and fulfillment in their work while others find it an experience only slightly better than being tortured. While many people may merely speculate on the factors that affect our work lives, we will explore solid evidence concerning the key factors that have been found to influence employee attitudes, motivation, and performance. You will build awareness of interpersonal dynamics, and gain insights into how to manage the behavior of others more effectively.

Whether you are working for a Fortune 100 company, a dot-com startup, or something in between, it has become increasingly clear that “the people make the place”. We’ll learn how organizations acquire, develop, and maintain high-performing employees. We will examine HR systems from a managerial point of view to help you become informed consumers of practices that affect the quality of life in an organization. This should help you manage your own career and provide useful skills as you progress beyond your initial job placement.

International business is conducted with and through people from various cultural backgrounds. Cultural differences, if not understood and bridged, can be significant barriers to the implementation and success of a business venture. We’ll learn how to conduct business across borders and cultures by focusing on the cultural, political, economic and legal environments in which multinational corporations (MNCs) operate.

What is leadership? Which types of leadership are more effective? How do you get entire business units, and the people in them, motivated to do what needs to be done? Can leadership make a difference? We’ll ask and answer these questions while seeking to understand the process by which a person who holds responsibility is able to facilitate unit performance.

As the challenges and opportunities facing society and businesses grow more complex, and as stakeholders grow more diverse, organizations are increasingly seeking innovative ways to create and capture value.  In this course we will explore organization-centered methods of innovation while gaining proficiency in human-centered methods of innovation through an approach known as “design thinking”.  Design thinking is an iterative problem-solving process centered on understanding users and their unarticulated needs throughout the journey of product/service interactions. Systematic application of ethnographical research, ideation, prototyping, and customer co-creation lead to innovations grounded in human-centered design, applicable for both intra-preneurship (innovating within an organization) and entrepreneurship. Students will apply design thinking methodologies and innovation tools independently and in teams throughout the course of the semester to gain proficiency in innovation and design thinking tools and techniques.

The Foresight course challenges students to engage in the process of identifying and evaluating major issues and trends impacting society in the future and exploring potential business implications that can drive sustainable innovation. The course is designed to facilitate three core thinking skills (critical, systems and creative) within a framework of foresight tools and methods for assessing change, forecasting future scenarios and analyzing implications of future change. Students apply these thinking skills and the foresight framework in a semester-long team project on a topic of their choice to develop insights on emerging opportunities and provide recommendations on how business can positively influence future change and create resilient strategies to enable success in an uncertain future.

Innovation & Entrepreneurship Minor Courses

Sam Miller, Director of Undergraduate Studies – Innovation & Entrepreneurship
312 Mendoza College of Business
University of Notre Dame
miller.549@nd.edu
574-631-6732 (o)

Foundational Courses (Required)

This course serves as the foundational course for entrepreneurship minors. Students are introduced to competing definitions of entrepreneurship, its history and role in free market enterprise as an engine of economic growth, wealth creation, and improvement of the human condition; entrepreneurial personality traits and skill sets, and the mechanics of bringing a new product or service to market, including innovation and ideation, technology “push” and market “pull,” disruptive business models, and the elements of feasibility analyses and venture plans.

As the challenges and opportunities facing society and businesses grow more complex, and as stakeholders grow more diverse, organizations are increasingly seeking innovative ways to create and capture value.  In this course we will explore organization-centered methods of innovation while gaining proficiency in human-centered methods of innovation through an approach known as “design thinking”.  Design thinking is an iterative problem-solving process centered on understanding users and their unarticulated needs throughout the journey of product/service interactions. Systematic application of ethnographical research, ideation, prototyping, and customer co-creation lead to innovations grounded in human-centered design, applicable for both intra-preneurship (innovating within an organization) and entrepreneurship. Students will apply design thinking methodologies and innovation tools independently and in teams throughout the course of the semester to gain proficiency in innovation and design thinking tools and techniques.

Elective Courses (Choose 6 Credit Hours)

There is nothing more important than a well-lived life full of meaning and purpose. But how do you ensure you are following your right path? Using the principles of design thinking, students will embark on an intentional journey of understanding where they are, how to uncover new opportunities, how to test those ideas, and how to ultimately design your ideal journey forward.

Every new venture needs money and other resources to begin operation. The best source of money depends upon the nature of your idea and its stage of development. We’ll learn when it is best to go to your family and friends and when it is best to go to banks, angel investors, venture capitalists or other funding groups. Of course, you’ll need to know how to position your proposal, how to perform venture valuation and a bit about the theory of entrepreneurial finance. When you finish this course you will know who to approach to “show you the money” for your deal!

This course will teach students about prototyping processes in manufacturing including CNC, 3-D printing, injection molding, woodworking, and vacuum forming. They will engage with the IDEA Center, gaining first-hand experience with the SolidWorks CAD platform and 3-D printing resources for creating models and rendering of physical prototypes. A technical background is not required, but a maker mindset and curiosity for concept development is encouraged.

Students will work on defining and monitoring success metrics for client projects, prototyping and implementing
concepts, and apply hands on project management and client communication skills.

Innovation is essential for all organizations to address the most pressing challenges our world is facing. In Innovation &
Design Thinking (I&D), students applied design thinking frameworks to a pressing challenge where they empathized
with stakeholders, defined unmet needs and areas of opportunities, and ultimately identified innovations to prototype
and test. In Innovation for Impact, students evaluate and build on the portfolio of recommendations from I&D,
prioritizing those to move forward to implementation. Working directly with the client, as well as faculty and industry
advisors, students move into the role of consultant and implementer, setting and tracking weekly deliverables, scoping
budgets and costs, tracking and managing key performance indicators, and ensuring implementation for sustainable impact.

Design Thinking is grounded in immersing yourself in the challenge at hand to gain empathy for the user. The
Innovation & Design Immersion will give students the opportunity to travel to the client sight to conduct ethnographic
research and to test and iterate prototypes. Students will travel with Professor Angst to the partner site in Uganda to
conduct ethnographic research and test prototypes. Flights, lodging, and meals provided. Travel will take place over
fall break, departing 10/14 and returning 10/22. The class will meet two times before travel and two times after travel,
with exact times TBD. This course is application only. Preference is given to students that have completed or are
enrolled in Innovation & Design Thinking and/or Innovation for Impact. Please email Professor Angst at wangst@nd.edu

Some of the most dynamic and successful businesses are aspiring to a “double” or “triple bottom line”: profitability, beneficial human impact, and environmental sustainability. This course exposes students to a new and growing trend in leadership, venture creation, product design, and service delivery which uses the basic entrepreneurial template to transform the landscape of both for-profit and not-for-profit ventures.

This course will use Food and Beverage and Agriculture industries to unpack a wide range of topics to provide a broader view and understanding of the sustainability challenges faced by the companies today, the innovative approaches to address sustainability as they work toward future sustainability goals, and how companies make short/mid/long term business decisions as they strive to make sustainability a part of the company’s values and long-term strategy. A deep dive into the consumer evolving mindset toward sustainability will expose consumer motivations, needs, and “demands” the consumers place on the business and how business can effectively communicate their commitments, track the progress, and communicate back to the consumer to gain their trust.

Idea Discovery lives at the fuzzy front end of the entrepreneurial spectrum. It requires creativity and entrepreneurial foresight that enables innovators to, as Steve Jobs once said, “see around corners”. This course is structured as a lab-format experience in which student teams will conduct multiple exploratory “sprints” to uncover emerging opportunity spaces and imagine conceptual solutions that stretch the boundaries of entrepreneurial thinking. Along the way, students will be exposed to a range of creative geniuses including Leonardo Da Vinci, Thomas Edison, Buckminster Fuller, Walt Disney and others.

This course will explore issues, ideas, and trends likely to affect business and society over the next decade. A series of lectures on selected days throughout the semester will feature a wide range of experts on economic demography, biotechnology, religious fundamentalism, oil and peace, futurism and work, natural resources, and more. No examinations or graded assignments. Students must attend all lectures; no unexcused absences.***This course can be taken more than once, but business students are advised that it can only count once toward the BBA degree.

This course focuses on innovation and entrepreneurship of embryonic ideas and scientific breakthroughs and how to move them from the laboratory to the marketplace – from invention to venture. All entrepreneurial case studies will be focused on science-based and high-technology examples, such as nano-science, energy science, drug discovery, medical diagnostics, sophisticated algorithms, green technology, etc. The class is project-based, where students will develop a high technology business plan based on discoveries and inventions of Notre Dame science faculty. Students will have the flexibility to choose from a variety of topics for their final projects in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, mathematics, physics, or medicine. Individual or team projects are possible depending on preference. Does not count as science credit for majors in the College of Science.

Capstone Course (Required)

Alright, so you think you have an idea for a new venture and are looking to explore the path towards launch. This course will give aspiring founders a first-hand experience in building from an idea into a viable business venture, using the proven best practices used by some of the world’s most successful entrepreneurs. We’ll learn the first steps one should take that will lead to a successful launch rather than frustration and failure. In this course you will work as a team to define an idea for serving an emerging or unmet market need, work to create and validate a solution to serve this opportunity, and create a business model to justify the investment of resources necessary to launch the venture. Teams will pitch their progress at regular intervals to seasoned professional entrepreneurs and receive direct feedback on the business model fit and viability of the venture. When you finish the course you’ll better understand the discovery and validation steps that can lead to successful venture launch.