Virginia Eubanks 
Virginia Eubanks is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University at Albany, SUNY. She is the author of Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the PoorDigital Dead End: Fighting for Social Justice in the Information Age; and co-editor, with Alethia Jones, of Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith. Her writing about technology and social justice has appeared in Scientific AmericanThe NationHarper’s,and Wired. For two decades, Eubanks has worked in community technology and economic justice movements. She was a founding member of the Our Data Bodies Project and a Fellow at New America. She lives in Troy, NY.

 

Steven Clifford
Steven Clifford served as CEO for King Broadcasting Company and National Mobile Television. His previous jobs included Chief Financial Officer for King Broadcasting Company and Vice President for Bankers Trust Company. As Special Deputy Comptroller for the City of New York from 1974 to 1977, Clifford played a key role in helping the city avoid bankruptcy. He has been a director of fourteen public and private companies including US Bank, Todd Shipyards, Laird Norton Company, Harbor Properties, People's Bank, Winona Capital Management, KING FM and Diono. He is the author of "The CEO Pay Machine: How it Trashes America and How to Stop It," published by Blue Rider Press, a division of Penguin-Random House. Clifford has served on the Board of Trustees for Seattle Opera, Seattle Art Museum, Reed College, Institute for System Biology, Seattle Parks Foundation, Center for Infectious Disease Research and Seattle Youth Symphony.

 

Mary Nucciarone
Director, Financial Aid Mary Nucciarone is responsible for recommending and implementing policies and procedures in the administration, oversight, and distribution of federal, state, and institutional financial aid funds. She manages all operations related to the Office of Financial Aid including supporting the administration of the University’s undergraduate scholarships, student employment and public relations matters. She is involved in strategic planning of how to create optimal results from the use of aid. In addition, she serves as a primary financial aid liaison to University’s colleges and departments serving undergraduate and graduate students. Mary began her financial aid career at Saint Mary’s College after receiving her degree from Marquette University. She is currently a trustee of the College Board, chair of the College Board Colloquium Planning Committee, member of the College Board Task Force on Reauthorization, and a board member of the Scholarship Foundation of St. Joseph County.

 

Marc Burdell
Office of Student Enrichment, Program Director Marc D. Burdell, a 1987 graduate of the University of Notre Dame, is the current Program Director for the Office of Student Enrichment within the Division of Student Affairs at the University of Notre Dame. The Office provides a comprehensive enrichment program that will enable undergraduate students with the highest financial need to get the most from their Notre Dame experience. The department will create an environment where students feel welcome and confident at the University and have a sense of belonging. We will work to identify and remove all barriers to their success. Prior to this new role he was the Director of the alumni programs department at Notre Dame’s Alumni Association. He previously served as the Senior Director, Professional & Academic Programs for the NDAA. Burdell, who earned a bachelor’s degree in the Arts and Letters Program for Administrators at Notre Dame, returned to work at the University in February, 2006. He spent his nineteen year career in the healthcare industry. Before returning to Notre Dame, Burdell was the acting CEO and Vice President of Sales and Marketing of Humana Inc. of Arizona. Prior to that, he was a national vice president of PhDx e-Systems, a spine and orthopedic outcomes measurement company. Over a fifteen-year period, he held various other positions with major healthcare insurers before joining Humana in 2003. He has served as vice chairman of the board for the AK Foundation in Phoenix Arizona, a group dedicated to serving uninsured single mothers and their children; he also served on the board of the Suns Nite Hoops Organization, an affiliate of the Phoenix Suns that focuses on getting troubled teens back on the right track.

 

Dan Graff
Dan Graff has been the director of the Higgins Labor Program since 2014. Dedicated to encouraging the Notre Dame community to realize the centrality of "the labor question" -- Who does the work, who gets the fruits, and who makes the rules? -- to all human endeavors, Graff has initiated projects like the Labor Cafe, Lunchtime Labor RAPS, HFAN (the Higgins Friends & Alumi Network), and the Just Wage Working Group (with Professor Clemens Sedmak). He also writes and curates original online content, including the Labor Song of the Month, Work of Art/Art of Work, and The Labor Question Today blog. Graff holds a joint faculty appointment as professor of the practice in the department of history, where he served as director of Undergraduate Studies for fifteen years, winning a 2011 Edmund P. Joyce Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching and a 2013 Dockweiler Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Advising. He offers courses in US labor and nineteenth-century history, including "Labor & America since 1945," "Abraham Lincoln's America," "US Labor History to 1945," "Food, Work, & Power in American History," and "Frederick Douglass, Abraham Lincoln, and the Struggle against Slavery." He has written and published extensively on the histories of work, race, and citizenship in the United States, and his paper at the 2010 Collective Memory in St. Louis Symposium was awarded the Best Paper Prize ("Lovejoy's Legacies: Race, Religion, and Freedom in St. Louis (and American) Memory"). His current research projects include labor licensing codes of conduct in contemporary American universities; race, labor, and citizenship in nineteenth-century St. Louis; and representations of the chronic crisis facing workers in the US since 1981. Graff earned his B.A. in history from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his M.A. and Ph.D. in U.S. history from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

 

Charlice Hurst
The primary focus of Hurst’s research is on interpersonal dynamics in the workplace and how interpersonal relationships influence well-being and performance. Hurst often examines, in particular, the roles of personality and gender in shaping interpersonal relationships between coworkers and between leaders and followers. Among her ongoing research projects, Hurst is examining how transitioning to a virtual work environment affects team member relationships, how leaders perceive and respond to employee voice (speaking up), and how unintentional norm violations by newcomers affect their adjustment to their new organization. Prior to embarking on her academic career, she spent ten years as a fundraising and management consultant to nonprofit organizations and social enterprises. Areas of Expertise Development and effects of interpersonal relationships at work Gender and race in the workplace Stereotyping and discrimination Personality and self-concept

 

Bob Mundy
Director of Admissions, Bob Mundy, who received his degree from Notre Dame in 1976, majored in American studies with a secondary education certification from Saint Mary’s College. He then returned to his hometown near Allentown, Pennsylvania to work at his alma mater, Tamaqua High School. He taught history and coached cross country and basketball at Tamaqua for seven years. After completing his Master’s degree in government and international studies back at Notre Dame in 1981, he was offered the position of an admissions counselor in the Office of Undergraduate Admissions in 1983. He was responsible for recruitment of students from Pennsylvania and most of the “west”. He has remained in Admissions for 26 years and continues to maintain a “geographic area” for recruitment (the “west”), since the position allows him to keep in touch with the students, parents and high school counselors. In his current position as Director of Admissions Operations, he oversees the 35 members of staff, and recruitment efforts that have included as many as 40,000 annual inquiries and a record-setting 16,500 applications for the 2011 class. Ultimately, the office is responsible for “delivering” a freshmen class of approximately 2,000 students, while also satisfying the needs of various constituencies: i.e. alumni, athletics, the Development Office, etc. Under Mundy’s tenure, the past ten years have seen improvements in academic and non-academic quality, diversity enrollment, and maintenance of alumni children enrollment (expected to be 24 percent this year).